About

The Feminist Duration Reading Group focuses on under-known and under-appreciated feminist texts, movements and struggles from outside the Anglo-American feminist tradition. The group was established in March 2015 by Helena Reckitt, at Goldsmiths, University of London and relocated in July 2015 to SPACE in Hackney, East London where it was hosted until April 2019. In June 2019, the group began a year-long residency at the South London Gallery focused on intersectional feminisms in the UK context.

FDRG sessions have been organised with Emilia-Amalia at Art Metropole in Toronto; in London at the Barbican Art Centre; Mimosa House, AntiUniversity; as part of The Table at the Swiss Church; and elsewhere in the UK at Grand Union, Birmingham; De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea; and Hypatia Trust, Penzance.           

Currently the group meets once a month, alternately on the second Wednesday of the month at 7pm at the South London Gallery, and the second Saturday of the month at 4pm a non-institutional venue.

The FDRG welcomes feminists of all genders and generations to explore the legacy and resonance of art, thinking and collective practice from earlier periods of feminism, in dialogue with contemporary practices and movements.

Working Group

FDRG activities are initiated by a Working Group. Current members are:

Giulia Antonioli, Angelica Bollettinari, Lina Džuverović, Lily Evans-Hill, Sabrina Fuller, Haley Ha, Félicie Kertudo, Mariana Lemos, Ceren Özpinar, Sara Paiola, Helena Reckitt, Justin Seng, Ehryn Torrell and Fiona Townend.

Contact us:

If you would like to join the reading group mailing list or propose a focus for a session, or invite us to lead a meeting, please contact: feministduration@gmail.com 

Wages for Housework – Confrontation

Wages for Housework – Confrontation

Feminist Duration Reading Group on Wages for Housework: Confrontation, 7 November 2017. Led by Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn.

Feminist Duration Reading Group on Wages for Housework: Confrontation, 7 November 2017. Led by Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn.

Tue 7 Nov, 7-9pm
SPACE Mare Street
Free & all welcome

led by Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn

This meeting comprises an out-loud reading of the transcription of the 1975 episode of Confrontation, produced by the CBC. It features Canadian spokesperson for the Wages for Housework Committee Judith Ramirez who, reviled by a panel that includes writer Richard Lubbock, actress Barbara Hamilton and Eileen Morris from HOMEMAKER Magazine, advocates for payment to housewives.

The International Wages for Housework Campaign was a feminist and social movement formed to raise awareness of how housework and childcare as the basis of all social reproduction and industrial work. The groups, which included lesbians, black and third world women, were not only discussion clubs or thought experiments. The demands for the Wages for Housework formally called for economic compensation for domestic work but also used these demands to more generally call attention to the affective labor of women, and made explicit how capitalist economies exploited labour practices against women.

In addition to the transcript for Confrontation, the papers “The Autonomy of Black Lesbian Women,” by Wilmette Brown of Black Women for Wages for Housework, and the manifesto “Fucking is Work,” by Wages Due Lesbians will be read.  With thanks to Christina Rousseau who sourced these texts for an earlier meeting on Wages for Housework organised with the Emilia-Amalia feminist working group in Toronto.

Hosted by artist Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn, this instalment of the Feminist Duration Reading Group stems from her research on lyrics written by Boo Watson, former member of the Wages for Housework and Wages Due Lesbians. Watson’s songs featured in the Wages for Housework International’s “Conference song book” (1975). Nguyễn is interested in the process of translation from social struggles to a collective voice. ‘If women were paid for all they do, there’d be a lot of wages due’ sang the women campaigners in the 1970s.

Hydrofeminism

Hydrofeminism

Italian Feminisms and the Practice of Entrustment   

Italian Feminisms and the Practice of Entrustment