About

The Feminist Duration Reading Group focuses on under-known and under-appreciated feminist texts, movements and struggles from outside the Anglo-American feminist tradition. The group was established in March 2015 by Helena Reckitt, at Goldsmiths, University of London and relocated in July 2015 to SPACE in Hackney, East London where it was hosted until April 2019. In June 2019, the group began a year-long residency at the South London Gallery focused on intersectional feminisms in the UK context.

FDRG sessions have been organised with Emilia-Amalia at Art Metropole in Toronto; in London at the Barbican Art Centre; Mimosa House, AntiUniversity; as part of The Table at the Swiss Church; and elsewhere in the UK at Grand Union, Birmingham; De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea; and Hypatia Trust, Penzance.           

Currently the group meets once a month, alternately on the second Wednesday of the month at 7pm at the South London Gallery, and the second Saturday of the month at 4pm a non-institutional venue.

The FDRG welcomes feminists of all genders and generations to explore the legacy and resonance of art, thinking and collective practice from earlier periods of feminism, in dialogue with contemporary practices and movements.

Working Group

FDRG activities are initiated by a Working Group. Current members are:

Giulia Antonioli, Angelica Bollettinari, Lina Džuverović, Lily Evans-Hill, Sabrina Fuller, Haley Ha, Félicie Kertudo, Mariana Lemos, Ceren Özpinar, Sara Paiola, Helena Reckitt, Justin Seng, Ehryn Torrell and Fiona Townend.

Contact us:

If you would like to join the reading group mailing list or propose a focus for a session, or invite us to lead a meeting, please contact: feministduration@gmail.com 

Translation as a Feminist Practice

Translation as a Feminist Practice

This meeting focuses on translation as a feminist practice. 

Together we read sections of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s “The Politics of Translation” from her book Outside in the Teaching Machine (1993). Though the essay does not relate directly to the reading group’s primary focus on the texts and practices of Italian feminisms, we will consider how Spivak’s emphasis on translation as an imperative for feminist politics relates to the group’s overall aims and ambitions. 

Three short introductory excerpts, taken from Italian feminist texts in English-language editions, are included as supplementary reading. Teresa de Lauretis and Lucia Chiavola Birnbaum’s translation notes, though brief, highlight several issues relating to the interpretation of Italian feminist texts in a second language. Navigating these issues, Sandra Kemp and Paola Bono’s introduction to The Lovely Mirror: Italian Perspectives on Feminist Theory presents, instead of a traditional introductory text, a Q&A between a British academic and her Italian colleague. 

Texts

Teresa de Lauretis, ‘Note on Translation,’ in Sexual Difference: The Milan Women’s Bookstore Collective, Indiana University Press,

Sandra Kemp and Paola Bono, Introduction: Without a leg to stand on, in The Lonely Mirror: Italian Perspectives on Feminist Theory, Sandra Kemp and Paolo Bono (eds), London: Routledge, 1993

Lucia Chiavola Birnbaum, ‘note,’ from Liberazion della donna (Feminism in Italy), Wesleyan, 1986

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, ‘The Politics of Translation,’ in Outside in the Teaching Machine, New York: Routledge, 1993, pp 179-200

Intimate Acts, workshop led by Kajsa Dahlberg and Laura Guy, The Showroom, London, as part of Now You Can Go, December 2015. Photo: Helena Reckitt

Intimate Acts, workshop led by Kajsa Dahlberg and Laura Guy, The Showroom, London, as part of Now You Can Go, December 2015. Photo: Helena Reckitt

Now You Can Go

Now You Can Go

Adriana Cavarero

Adriana Cavarero